M7: Final assignment

A. Leading for the future

When asked to define leadership at the beginning of the year, I proposed we do away with the idea altogether, encouraging networks of interdependent and supportive collaborators instead.

Now that the year has come to a close, I’m not sure if I stand by my definition. On the one hand, I think that’s still my goal – to encourage those I work with to each take the lead in their areas. On the other hand, I have come to accept that this kind of encouragement is itself a form of leadership. It doesn’t happen automatically; it requires intent and skill.

I’m more prepared now to wholeheartedly accept the definition by Stephen Covey that I posted at the beginning of the year: to communicate to people their worth and potential so clearly that they are inspired to see it in themselves.

Based on what I’ve learned this year about listening to myself and my body, I would go a little further. Continue reading

M5 Final Assignment

Part 1: Life Audit

I chose to do the Life Audit, which got a little challenging around the 50-goal mark, but then I got a burst of inspiration towards the end. The things about having 100 goals, I’ve noticed, is that you can be a bit “wasteful”, which is a great way for figuring out what you want more of in life. In my case, it was art – opportunities to create and engage in a bit of pottering around. 27 of my post-its had a wish that was art-related, whether it was learning to knit or taking an improv class. I don’t think I can realistically take up all 27, but it’s an indicator that I need at least one. Continue reading

Magic Wardrobes and Abundance Thinking

christmas bounty

This is a story about a magic wardrobe – but I’m getting ahead of myself here.

So let me start by asking you a question. How many of you believed in Santa Claus when you were little? I certainly did. I believed in Santa long after I’d given up on fairies, and witches, and thinking that if I concentrated hard enough, I’d be able to fly. Year after year, when I opened my eyes on Christmas morning, I would find myself surrounded by toys. Model trains and Lego sets, Barbie dolls, books, puzzles, one of those early Super Soakers – you name that 90s toy, I got it for Christmas.

Let me be clear, though. It wasn’t because I got a lot of toys that I believed. Continue reading

HW2.1 Updated Network Participation Rubric

Prompt: Write an updated version of your Network Participation Rubric.

Response: You can find a template for the rubric here. Below is mine — it’s changed a lot of over the past month, in part because the readings are so new to me that I want to be able to sit with them, understand the concepts I’m being introduced to, and see where exploring them takes me. Also, my original bibliography proposal is somewhat outside the scope of this half-term class; I’m hoping it will inform an independent study next term.

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Four effective conference strategies from #Hive7 (that I will probably steal)

This is the first of a four-part series on my experiences at the Hive Global Leaders retreat in Boston.

I gave up my Patriot’s Day weekend to attend Hive, a programme that brings together change-makers from all over the world (a record 155 attendees from 57 countries). The conference/retreat structure was highly unusual; it challenged my assumptions and gave me ample opportunity to reflect on my approach to life and work. While it took me a while to get comfortable with the format, here some of the thought-provoking Hive strategies I liked best. Continue reading

Books on education, technology, and learning at scale

This is my running list of books mentioned in class readings and that seemed intriguing, listed here mostly as a reminder to self.

Whistling Vivaldi: How Stereotypes Affect Us and What We Can Do — Claude M. Steele (borrowed)

The Monsters of Education Technology — Audrey Watters
(Alternatively, find and read the following articles: The history of the future of ed-tech / Un-fathomable : the hidden history of ed-tech (read for class) / Teaching machines : a brief history of “teaching at scale” / Against “innovation” / Engaging flexible learning / Robots and education labor / Moving from “open” to justice / Men explain technology to me : on gender, ed-tech, and the refusal to be silent / Ed-tech’s monsters / The future of education : programmed or programmable / Beyond the LMS / The future of ed-tech is a reclamation iproject / Beneath the cobblestones : a domain of one’s own / Convivial tools in an age of surveillance.

Teaching in a Digital Age — A. W. (Tony) Bates

Schools of Tomorrow — John and Evelyn Dewey (borrowed)

The Children’s Machine: Rethinking School in the Age of the Computer + Mindstorms: Children, Computers, and Powerful Ideas — Seymour Papert (borrowed)

Deschooling Society — I. Illich (borrowed)

The End of Average — Todd Rose

Seth Godin’s Tribes and the Connectivist MOOC

About a month ago, I read Simon Sinek’s Start With Why as part of a course I’m enrolled in, and found myself frustrated for a number of reasons. After reflecting on what I wished he had addressed, I realised that my concerns stemmed from my personal preoccupations with the politics of belonging and social inclusion. I began to wonder if other popular thought leaders addressed this politics in their texts on tribe-making, and decided that Seth Godin’s book Tribes was an appropriate starting point.

Tribes is more leadership manifesto than book, with spare prose, lightly sketched examples, and no end-notes. In a sense, it feels strange to so seriously critique a text that is meant more as a provocation than a playbook, but I decided to do it anyway.

Continue reading